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20121201
20121231
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and whispering that "this is beauty, this is humanity, this is america." >> announcer: funding is provided by -- carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org." anne gumowitz. the betsy and jesse fink foundation. the hkh foundation. barbara g. fleischman. and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. >> welcome. junot diaz is known to start convers
sponsor, mutual of america, designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. >> welcome. sometimes we can see the universe in a grain of sand, as the old saying goes, but nowadays a graphic chart more vividly reveals the world we live in. take a look at this statistical snapshot of the media ecology that largely determines what you and i see, read, and hear. in 1983, 50 corporations controlled a majority of media in america. in 1990 the number had dropped to 23. in 1997, 10. and today, six. there you have it -- the fistful of multinational conglomerates that own the majority of media in america. what do we call it when a few firms dominate the market? oligopoly. doesn't quite rhyme with democracy. but today, believe it or not, big media is about to get even bigger, unless the public stands up and says "no!" here's the story. the chairman of the federal communications commission -- the fcc, the agency of government created by congress to protect the public's rightful ownership of the airwaves -- is reportedly asking the other four co
signals, and then we are off. >> reporter: in most of america, u.p.s. drivers spend a lot of time behind the wheel. not tony. he parks his truck less than two miles away for the whole day. >> i prefer to park and uh let my legs do the work, you know what i mean? >> reporter: today, tony is lucky to have the help of angel tirado, a seasonal worker. so, it's angel who delivers dozens of heavy boxes to a garment warehouse. meanwhile, tony minds the truck and gets ready for the next delivery, offering up some tips of the trade: like the importance of making friends in the buildings. >> at least once a week, every one of my freight guys, they're going to get a coffee from me. once in a while, you know, i'll go get like a couple of sandwiches. i mean, they make my life a whole lot easier. i want them liking me! >> reporter: after a while, i persuade tony to let me deliver two packages to a building across the street. that means, i'm also responsible for the diad-- the electronic clipboard tracking all the packages. i have two packages for you. >> great. >> reporter: and i need you to sign. wit
♪ ♪ ♪ >> this week on "moyers and company" -- the scheme to remake america, one statehouse at a time. >> politicians and corporate representatives, corporate lobbyists were actually voting behind closed doors on these changes to the law before they were introduced in statehouses across the country. >> the united states of alec. and perfidious and passionate poetry from philip appleman. >> money buys prophets and teachers, poems and art. so, listen, if you're so rich, why aren't you smart? >> funding is provided by -- carnegie corporation of new york. celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine
to america. right now china is the leading country. russia is certainly in the top 5 with over 700,000 orphans in that country. there's certainly plenty of children who need a loving family here in the united states. >> suarez: how about that side of the story. unicef estimate there is's only about 18,000 russian families looking to adopt children. that's a disproportionate number considering the need for new homes. >> it is. last year alone here in america there were a thousand children adopted from russia. there are many american families, many of whom right now are in the process of adopting these children that are willing, ready, and able to adopt these kids, some of which have severe special needs. so it speaks to the heart of these american families that are willing to adopt these kids and bring them home. the. >> suarez: but there have been unfortunate stories that have gotten a lot of attention here in the united states and back in russia >> does that make things more difficult for your organization and others that are watching international adoptions? >> sure, well, i thin
america? >> tom: i'm tom hudson. president obama tries to win over top business leaders, warning republicans are holding the global economy hostage over the fiscal cliff. >> susie: and apple shares get of the most widely owned stocks sees heavy trading. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r." >> susie: big job cuts today at one of the nation's biggest banks. citigroup announced it's slashing 4% of its staff; that works out to 11,000 jobs worldwide. the cuts will save the bank more than $1 billion a year in expenses. but they won't be cheap, resulting in a billion-dollar charge against fourth-quarter earnings. is this gloomy news from citi the beginning of other companies doing the same? suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: 11,000 jobs are a lot of layoffs, even for a bank as huge as citi. and there could be more. that's because the monster firm is still struggling to recover from the great recession even though it has fired a lot of other workers in the last few years. the thing is, citi has a new c.e.o. in michael corbat, and experts say he's anxious to make his mark, even if t
the upon population of the united states of america. we're very dwirs, but i think we need to show the nation that a group of people committed to the common good can come together and pass a law that's necessary for the public safety, whether you're in a rural area, a suburban or urban area, we a have children. those of white house are parents understand how precious life is. we have ae great poeet from illinois, carl sandberg who said, "the birth of a baby is god's opinion the world should go on." it's high time we protect our children, ptect ourte babies from the harm of assault weapons and b high-capacity ammunition magazines. >> ifill: do you have any sense that public opinio is shifting in your state? >> oh, i believe so. i don't think there's any question. anecdotally, just visiting with the people on the street-- i was at a dayce center today, an early-childhood center, and you can tell how committed moms and dads are to getting a law pads to protect their children. no matter where you live in america, children come first. the great thing about our country is parents sacrifi
. fleischmann and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing group, individual, and retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. >>> welcome. the bells rang for the lost. charlotte bacon, olivia engle, anna marquez green, catherine hubbard, emilie parker, jack pinto, noah posner, jessica ricos, benjamin wheeler, and allison wyatt. all were 6 years old. daniel barden and grace mcdonald were 7. six adults died with them. mary sherlock, dawn hochsprung, victoria soto. it helps to say their names to rescue them from the statistical anonymity that always settles over these awful events. it helps those of us distanced from the loss to imagine to even grieve the emptiness of the homes and hearts of those who loved them. we will never forget. we mourn, move on, and too soon forget. then it will happen again some day. we'll scratch our heads and ask ourselves, was the last time newtown or columbine? was it aurora or that college in virginia? once again, we will mourn, move on, and too soon forget. there is an old saying that in remembrance is the secret of redemption.
are made and what drives those companies? tonight in this "n.b.r." special edition "made in america" we go to towns small and large to meet unique businesses building jobs and profits. that and more tonight on "n.b.r." good evening, i'm mike hegedus with an n.b.r. special edition, made in america. walking down kentucky street in downtown petaluma, california, but it could be anywhere, u.s.a. this is where small businesses live. small businesses that create two out of every three new jobs in the u.s. tonight you're going to meet some of the people behind those businesses and find out how they plan to keep building those businesses. we begin with the housing market, ground zero for the recession. from construction to appliance makers, when it collapsed it took a lot of very good companies down with it. but here's one that has managed to learn how to paint over the rough spots. you can brush it on, you can roll it on, you can get it on your pants. paint. the kelly moore plant in san carlos, california, turns out nearly 40,000 gallons a day. it's one of the largest employee-owned paint operati
to hit america in the gut. i think impact would be really strong. if anybody thinks this is going to be a slope better wake up. >> ifill: the link between brain injury and sports, new evidence ties repeated blows to the head to long-term damage. we take a look. >> brown: ray suarez looks at the firestorm over israel's announcement it will expand settlements in the west bank. >> ifill: elizabeth brackett looks at how one chicago school is dealing with the transition to new state-wide standards. >> i really did find that the kids do understand more, and they learn more. they're more interested in what they're learning. >> brown: plus, as global carbon dioxide levels hit record highs, we analyze the increasing difficulty of combating climate change, with carol davenport of the "national journal." >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financi
. and that was especially true today. i know there's not a parent in america who doesn't feel the same overwhelming grief that i do. the majority of those who died today were children. beautiful little kids between the ages of 5 and 10 years old. they had their entire lives ahead of them. birthdays, graduations, weddings, kids of their own. among the fallen were also teachers, men and women who devoted their lives to helping our children fulfill their dreams. so our hearts are broken today. for the parents and grandparents, sisters and brothers of these little children. and for the family its of the adults who were lost. our hearts are broken for the parents of the survivors as well. for as blessed as they are to have their children home tonight, they know that their children's innocence has been torn away from them too early and there are no words that will ease their pain. as a country we have been through this too many times. whether it's a elementary school in newtown or a shopping mall in oregon, or a temp el in wisconsin, or a movie these never aurora or a street corner in chicago, these neighborho
of these incidents happening in america makes me say, you know, enough is enough. there's got to be a rational way to sort through this. i'm not saying i've got a perfect piece of legislation. i don't think there is a single perfect piece of legislation. but in a country where we got 30,000 gun deaths a year, there's got to be a way that we can do a bit more. i hope that responsible gun owners around america will join in this conversation as well. i think we have to recognize that it is about rational appropriate gun rules but also about mental health issues. my hope is our country takes a deep breath and doesn't just simply get exercised by this for a few moments and then push this horrible tragedy back into the background and forget about it. >> ifill: assuming that there is is not one single solution here, let's talk about what you mean when you say rational gun control. senator feinstein says an assault weapons ban would be rational. would you agree with that? >> i think that from the evidence i've seen that a lot of the challenge comes around the speed by which you can shoot... in effect, you
serving america with a great dedication every day in diplomatic posts around the world. >> brown: spending versus saving: amid the last-minute holiday rush, paul solman weighs the economic benefits. >> holiday season grand central terminal and a key question: is consumerism kind of a bad thing that's overdone this time of year? or is it the key driving economic and moral force in our society? >> suarez: and we close with another in our series of interviews with newly elected congressional members. tonight, north dakota's senator- elect, democrat heidi heitkamp. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station
for america's highest earners, house republicans strongly oppose: >> instead of reforming the tax code and cutting spending, the president wants to raise tax rates. but even if the president got the tax rate hike that he wanted, understand that we would continue to see trillion dollar deficits for as far as the eye can see. washington's got a spending problem, not a revenue problem. >> tom: congress and the president have 24 days to reach a deal, before the fiscal cliff's tax hikes and spending cuts take effect. >> susie: mark zandi says "bad things will happen to the economy pretty fast" if lawmakers don't settle the fiscal cliff issue. he's chief economist of moody's analytics. so mark falling off the fiscal cliff means bad things. how bad? >> it could be quite bad, susie. i don't think it's if we get into january and we haven't settled this but if house makers haven't nailed this down by early february, i think stock investors, bond investors will start to get very very nervous, start selling, risky businesses pull back and by the end of february when we start approaching the ceilin
positive this week on a few big banks, helping fuel an extended rally. bank of america, for example. today's 2.9% rally comes on top of a huge jump this year. b-of-a shares have more than doubled since january, and they continue to break out to 18- month highs on stronger than average volume. after the close, the market focus was on research in motion. with its newest blackberry device due out early next year, the stock has been rallying, even as the company continues to lose money. but the silver lining is that it didn't lose as much money as feared in its latest quarter, and it generated more revenue than was anticipated. on its conference call tonight, the company said the quarter was a reflection of "the successful transition the company is making," even though it acknowledged losing one million blackberry device customers. investors and traders have been betting on the transition. the stock was up 3.6% during the regular session, closing at its highest price since march. and then, in extended hours trading after reporting its quarterly results, the stock added another 7%, trading over
're a rare breed in corporate america. we look at why so few c.e.o.'s are women. that and more, tonight on nbr. >> susie: not a very merry day of trading on wall street today. it was a holiday shortened session, and the investors and traders working on this half- day were playing it safe, especially with the fiscal cliff talks on holiday break as well. when the closing bell rang at 1:00 eastern time, the dow was down 51 points, the nasdaq lost eight, and the s&p was off 3 points. so while wall street worked half a day, washington was on vacation. lawmakers are increasingly pessimistic about a big agreement-- or any agreement-- being reached before the year ends. darren gersh has the latest. >> reporter: 'twas the night before christmas, and all through the house, nothing much was going on. it was the same story in the senate. washington's cliff talks still remain deadlocked. congress will return on thursday, and it's still possible a few days of holiday cheer and constituent outrage may push republicans and democrats to craft a last-minute agreement to avoid the worst of the fiscal clif
america, the cdc has discovered certain communities where parents are hesitating to vaccinate their children. one is ashland, oregon. >> you're walking? >> yeah. what am i going to do with the baby scooter? this is our neighborhood, and we love it because we can walk everywhere. ashland is a very safe town compared to almost every place else in america. >> narrator: it's a college town, the home of an annual shakespeare festival, where a well-off, educated populace has easy access to alternative organic food co-op and yoga centers. >> go get 'em! >> narrator: jennifer margulis, a writer with a ph.d in english literature, is the mother of four children. >> when my daughter was born in 1999, the nurse bustled in with her tray and said, "okay, it's time for your hepatitis b vaccine." and i looked at my daughter and i looked at the nurse, and i said, "isn't hepatitis b a sexually transmitted disease?" and i said, "why am i supposed to vaccinate my newborn baby against a sexually transmitted disease?" and the nurse got really mad. >> narrator: margulis went on to research and write
house. >> i am very proud to announce my choice for america's next secretary of state, john kerry. in a sense, john's entire life has prepared him for this role. having served with valor in vietnam, he understands that we have a responsibility to use american power wisely, especially our military power. and he knows, from personal experience, that when we send our troops into harm's way, we must give them the sound strategy, a clear mission, and the resources that they need to get the job done. in an extraordinarily distinguished senate career and as chairman of the foreign relations committee, john has played a central role in every major foreign policy debate for nearly 30 years. as we turn the page on a decade of war, he understands that we've got to harness all elements of american power and ensure that they're working together-- diplomatic and development, economic and political, military and intelligence-- as well as the power of our values which inspire so many people around the world. he is not going to need a lot of on-the-job training. he has earned the respect and trust
charter schools that aim to be the model-ts of education. >> america has lots of terrific schools. people open great schools every year, but they typically open just one. nobody has figured out how to mass produce high quality, cost effective schools. >> brown: we remember general norman schwarzkopf-- the man who commanded american-led forces in the persian gulf war known as "desert storm." >> warner: plus, mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the final weekend has now arrived before the fiscal cliff hits on new year's day and wit
, or lower class it shouldn't be any class, it should be america coming together and right now in our house that's a big cause of debate. >> reporter: but washington isn't a source of optimism these days. >> if they make a deal it certainly won't be a good one, they'll say this is something we've got to get done and i don't think it's going to be using any brain power to do it. >> reporter: already there is growing talk in washington of a so-called mini-deal. >> let's hope they do. the president was serious. he was friendly in the statement he made-- >> he's going on vacation. he's going to hawaii. >> susan: yeah, but there's an urgency here, and do you think we are going to be any closer to getting a deal done? >> the president really scaled back his ambitions for the immediate time. he said, look, guys, nancy pelosi, come back, try to do the minimum, try to do the least amount of harm. and then come up with some way to say that we'll address bigger issues in the new year. >> he proposed tonight a smaller package, a smaller deal. what will this mean for the economy? what will it mean for
, every family in america will see their income taxes automatically go up on january 1. i mean, i... i'm assuming that doesn't sound too good to you. >> no. >> that's sort of like the lump of coal you get for christmas. that's a scrooge christmas. >> warner: in washington, republicans portrayed the road trip as so much humbug, at a time, they said, when negotiations are going nowhere. >> there's a stalemate. let's not kid ourselves. >> warner: house speaker john boehner said republicans remain willing to raise revenues, but not by raising tax rates. and he charged the white house isn't negotiating in good faith. >> the day after the election, i said the republican majority would accept new revenue as part of a balanced approach that includes real spending cuts and reforms. now, the white house took three weeks to respond with any kind of a proposal, and much to my disappointment, it wasn't a serious one. >> reporter: that proposal was presented by treasury secretary timothy geithner yesterday to congressional leaders. it was widely reported today that the white house offer called for:
. there have been north of 300,000 layoffs. you have seen it at u.b.s., bank of america, which is strug ling with the own acquisitions. you have even seen it at goldman sacs, one of the winners after the financial crisis. it's actually, if you talk to these bank c.e.o.s they will tell you it's a difficult time to run a multinational bank. even with the bailout, and interest rates of 0 for four years, even when they offer you and me nothing on our savings and checking accounts they say in their own defense, we're dealing with unprecedented regulation. we have to curb proprietary trading. we have regulators breathing down our neck and it's hard to earn an extra buck in that environment. you're seeing citi, in fact, address those concerns in the layoff announcement today. >> ifill: what does that tell bus the health of the banking sector and whether other big banking institution might be following suit? >> citigroup is not as mump an indicator species as i think people would want it to be. 15 years ago, it was the financial supermarket. it rolled everything together. it's one-stop shopping, and
immigrants from mexico, central america and the like? now, the mexican economy is also coming back. that actually has been very helpful. mexico now is talking about having its own border patrol on their northern border. that would be very helpful. i think we want to work together with mexico and their new leadership on what we do with respect to illegal migration from central america. but all of these things, as your question says, they all are related with each other s you have to create the right balance. you have to have the right way for people to come in legally. you have to have the right balance for who can come in to work particularly in certain jobs where there's a continued labor shortage. when you do that, it allows us on the enforcement side to focus on those who have more nefarious purposes. >> suarez: now you've been a prosecutor, as you mentioned. you've been an executive, a state executive. but you've also been an elected official long enough to know that this is a political question as well. did november 6 change the calculations on both sides of the aisle? is ther
foundation. the hkh foundation. barbara g. fleischman. and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. >> welcome. lately i've had phaedra on my mind. not the greek myth of the tragic daughter of that name, but the retelling of the story in a 1962 movie starring tony perkins and melina mercouri. their illicit affair over, perkins crashes his cherished roadster over a cliff. a big sendoff accompanied by none other than johann sebastian bach. >> oh john sebastian! you're playing your music like crazy and i'm listening to it in greece! what are you doing here? oh john! why aren't you home minding the children? i at least had some business in greece! i had a father that killed every phaedra! phaedra! phaedra! >> that scene actually keeps coming to mind as i try to follow the melodrama in washington that has us heading for a cliff. a fiscal cliff. but are we? or is this, another myth in the making? for some insight, we turn to two seasoned observers both of whose books you'll want to as
on america's highest earners, the biggest sticking point. the two sides seem to be allowing themselves room to bargain. the president said today he'd be open to lowering tax rates for high earners later next year as part of a broad tax reform package. and senate republican leader mitch mcconnell did not directly endorse the g.o.p. plan. for now, house speaker boehner put the ball in the president's court, releasing a statement: "the president now has an obligation to respond with a proposal that can pass both chambers of congress." >> susie: we turn tonight to other opinions on the fiscal cliff impasse. we talk with the chairman of the national governor's association, and we also hear from a leading advocate for responsible fiscal policy. we begin with governor jack markell, the democrat from delaware. he was one of six governors meeting with president obama today to talk about how the fiscal cliff impacts their states. i asked him what was his message to the president. >> our message was pretty straightforward. we believe that it is important that governors have a seat at the table as the
's special. you don't see that in retailing in america. >> reporter: stores like sur la table are expected to be one of the few bright spots in an otherwise lackluster holiday season for merchants. in fact, some experts think home goods will be hotter than toys this holiday season. ibm projects home goods will see the strongest sales growth this year, up over 6%. that's far more than toys and electronics. >> you may ask yourself, why home? we think home is up because of a lot of things-- things like the changing demographic of the home itself. there's a stat that says that 41% of those between 25 and 29 are living back at home. >> reporter: but there also a second reason. >> we think that this holiday people are buying what they need vs. what they want. >> reporter: which had me wondering what's on jack schwefel's wish list this holiday season. it wasn't this $5,500 coffee maker. >> there are some new knives that i'm actually pretty excited about, so probably those. they're cutting board material actually used in the handle of the knives. >> reporter: and there's no denying it will look go
-sized crop. that and what we see out of the harvest in south america will determine the price for grain in 2013. >> tom: a look at the commodities and the federal reserve. lincoln ellis with us, werethe strategic financial group. and the federal reserve's big move. and that looming fiscal cliff, we'll have an update on that tomorrow. >> susie: investors were on fed-watch, tom, and it was very interesting watching the blue chip dow average as ben bernanke was giving his press conference. the dow got as high at 80 points, and the more he talked about the fiscal cliff and other issues facing the economy, it went down, down, down, closing down three points. >> tom: any of the enthusiasm that came out when the federal reserve announced it was going to continue to buy bonds slowly deflated throughout the afternoon, the longer the chairman tended to speak. there was less enthusiasm about what the federal reserve is doing. maybe less concern about why the federal reserve is doing it. let's go ahead and take a look at our "market focus." the major stock indices couldn't hold on to their midday g
evercore, he's plugged in to corporate america and wall street. and are apple's hot-selling products cooling off? is the competition winning over even apple's loyal fans? that and more tonight on "n.b.r." john boehner is pushing for his "plan b." this is the latest twist in those crucial fiscal cliff negotiations. the house speaker offered a back-up plan today to avoid falling off the cliff. he promised to bring a bill to the house floor this week that would raise income tax rates for people earning more than $1 million a year and no new spending cuts, for now. the white house immediately rejected it. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: house speaker john boehner says the president is asking for about half a trillion dollars more in taxes than he is willing to cut from spending. that means the two sides have narrowed their differences, but the speaker says not enough progress has been made to call it a deal. so he is making other plans. >> our plan b would protect american taxpayers who make a million dollars or less and have all of their current rates extended. >> reporter: while the
including barclays, bank of america, and so.,ete generale.ne >> susie: uncle sam may soon be exiting the auto business. the treasury department said today it will sell is remaining and controversial stake in general ms ors, in the next 15 months. as part of the deal, g-m willor buy back $5.5 billion in shares, and that will happen by the end of this year. g.m. stock revved higher on the news, climbing 7% to $27 a share. and, as suzanne pratt reports, some investors like the sound of an independent g.m. >> reporter: it looks like general motors may soon be hitting the road all by itself. four years after spending nearly $50 billion to rescue the struggling automaker, the u.s. treasury wants out. and, gm needed to shake off the stigma of being known as government motors. >> general motors to wanted do this. they wanted to get the government off its back so to speak and to prove to the people they can pay back the loan, part of the loan. >> reporter: other auto experts says everyone involved wanted to end this year on a positive news note. >> it helps the folks at gm and the government
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 59 (some duplicates have been removed)